2001

Sept. 11 - A Day That Will Long Be Remembered

Where were you on September 11? What were you doing? And how did you react when you first learned about the terrorist attacks on New York and Washington? That day is likely to be remembered by many World of English readers, just as their parents recall the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, the day martial law was declared in 1981 and when a Pole was elected pope three years earlier.

London Calling

London is the number one place in the world for the rock and pop music fan. It is home to more music publishers, record labels and live music venues than any other city. Here are just some of the places and addresses that have played, or still play, an important part in the history of British rock.

If the postcode begins with W1, WC1 or WC2, then you know you are in the centre of London. And as it's such a large city, we will only concentrate on the central area to give you a taste of London's rock 'n' roll past.

Jokes!

Here are some actual label instructions on consumer goods. We in the West are not all this stupid, honestly! Shop carefully!

1. On a Sears hairdryer: "Do not use while sleeping."

2. On a bag of Fritos: "You could be a winner! No purchase necessary. Details inside."

3. On a bar of Dial soap: "Directions: use like regular soap."

4. On some Swanson frozen dinners: "Serving suggestions: defrost."

5. On Tesco's Tiramisu dessert (printed on bottom of box): "Do not turn upside down."

From Westlife to Eternity?

After the Pogues and U2, there came the female voices of Sinéad O'Connor, Enya and the Cranberries. But what next? It was the boys' turn (well, mostly), and the money-makers have been having a field day.

A Memorable Little League World Series

Japan snatched the title from Florida, but to the delight of a 45,000-strong crowd former Little Leaguer U.S. President George W. Bush was in Williamsport, PA in August to watch the Little League Championship Game.

The 2001 Little League World Series will go down in history as one of the most memorable and significant events in Little League's glorious 55 years.

Return to Eden

In March this year a feat of architectural technology opened in the English county of Cornwall. From inside one of man's most modern buildings, the Eden Project brings you something as old as the world - Nature.

Linux

Say Windows and most people will know that you mean the operating system owned by Microsoft. Say Linux and youll probably get a blank stare either that or theyll think youre trying to sell them a new brand of washing powder.

Live and Let Live

If you think 007 is the new international dialling code then get a life! 007 is part of the British national consciousness: heroism, patriotism and self-parody. 007 is James Bond - with a licence to thrill...

Britain's Royal Affair

Who rules over England, Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales? Queen Elizabeth, of course! But besides being the richest woman in Britain and owning the most beautiful buildings, she's just a tourist attraction. It's the government and Parliament, and especially No.10 Downing Street, who write the rules.

Globalisation: the Good, the Bad and the Ugly

In the late 20th century, "Globalise!" was a catch-cry all over the world - now it's a dirty word. But it's a story of swings and roundabouts, pros and cons...

The American Gambler - it's in our blood!

If you wanna make big bucks, beware: America encourages the gambling addiction....

Amelia: Film Review

Amelia(Le Fabuleux Destin d'Amélie Poulain) was one of the definite highlights of this year's 17th Warsaw International Film Festival. This long awaited feature by Jean-Pierre Jeunet, the director of Delicatessen, was a great hit with critics and audiences alike, and has now been released in cinemas across Poland. Amelia is a must-see for all demanding cinemagoers who expect more from a film than merely entertainment. Posters advertising the film claim that the film's heroine, Amelia, could change your life. And this might actually be the case.

The Winner Takes it All

Or - the first past the post gets the most in the UK's General Election, which this year was a bit of a foregone conclusion...

The British Labour Party - a marriage of late 19th century trade unionism, Christian socialism and a very English form of Marxism (i.e. not very Marxist) - managed in the first election of the 21st century on 7th June this year to achieve something it had not managed throughout the last century - in fact, for its entire 101-year history. It won a second general election after a first term in office.

A Lyrical Exchange

The music's fabulous, the lyrics go from the simple to the surreal. But do they mean anything? And does it really matter?

No Dope, No Hope?

"You are what you eat" is a favourite health catchphrase, but in sport it seems more and more to be a case of: "You are when you cheat."

Get a Diet, Get Fat

In the all-American health kick, it's not sport but food that's at the center of the obsession with healthy living. But have they got it all wrong?

Spooked Out!

At first glance, the village of Pluckley in the English county of Kent may look quite innocent. But behind its neat and tidy exterior theres a phantasmal world of mystery, doom and death.

End of a Decade, End of an Era

There won't be many waves of Volunteers before the Poles will have caught up...This will be one of the world's great and limited engagements. Poland will not need us for long. - E. Timothy Carroll, Peace Corps Country Director 1991-1994

How to Marry an Englishman

The Empire has faded, but English surnames are colonising Central Europe at a rate of knots. Here's your guide, ladies, to bagging a Brit. Polish gentlemen, please don't feel too put out there are some useful tips for you, too.

E-Lit: Novel Networking

We say everyone has a novel in him. Boring as our own lives may seem to ourselves, they could be packaged and described so as to be interesting to another person - the reader. With a dose of literary flair!

Thanks to the popularity of creative writing courses, everyone, it seems, is finally writing that novel - or at least a short story or two and some poems. Poetry and fiction readings at coffeehouses have become popular in some circles, but apart from this, how do all these new writers find an audience? How do they get in touch with readers?